12 Similes I Can’t Seem To Find A Use For

Good writing can use similes for all sorts of illustrative concepts. I love similes… but here are twelve that are still lacking the first part of the sentence. I can’t figure out if these are usable or not.

 

…like a sealed soda can with a broken-off tab.

…like the sudden sinus burn of an unanticipated belch.

…like the twitchy facial fur of a dreaming dog.

…like discovering you bought the wrong deodorant scent.

…like a dropped Scrabble tile.

…like the baffling yet perversely pleasurable discovery that the hair you just tweezed was longer inside the skin than it was outside.

…like a pair of thin dress socks in December.

…like a game of “spot the faces in the textured ceiling.”

…like a shopping cart with two wonky wheels.

…like having a paper cut on one finger and a cardboard cut on another.

…like finding someone else’s silverware in your drawer.

…like a pointless list of simile halves.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Nothing To See Here, Words, Words, Words, Writing and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to 12 Similes I Can’t Seem To Find A Use For

  1. Kagey says:

    The two candidates steered the political debate like a shopping cart with two wonky wheels.
    His heart was like a sealed soda can with a broken off tab.
    My rival’s entrance hit me like the sinus burn of an unanticipated belch.
    As the Catholic participated in the Lutheran worship service, she realized it felt familiar, yet somehow off, like finding someone else’s silverware in her kitchen drawer.

    That’s what I’ve got right off the top of my head. I’m going to bed now.

  2. Lummox JR says:

    I would so love to see most of these in a book. Preferably all in the same book.

  3. Angela says:

    I see these in a gritty noir thriller. For example: “One thing Denton knew was that Leona Gladstone wasn’t talking. The dame was like a sealed soda can with a broken-off tab; you knew you’d have to rough it up a little to get what you wanted.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s